Motor City Car Club takes a trip down memory lane

Gary Challice (left, with his 1950 Mercury), Rick Hodges and Russ Major (right, with his 1963 Tempest). Photo by C. Stapleton.

Members of the Motor City Car Club took a trip down memory lane recently, marking the birthday of their president with a mystery tour that ended at their original headquarters in Orono.

The car club, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, was originally called the Kontinentals Rod & Custom Club of Oshawa, but changed its name to the MCCC when it merged with the Igniters, another rod and custom club in Oshawa in 1962.

Often confused with antique car refinishers, rod and custom car aficionados typically modify the engines, transmissions and/or suspensions of older cars, rather than simply restore them to their original condition.

A member of the Kontinentals when the clubs merged, Gary Challice of Oshawa, is the current president of MCCC, and one of four original members from 1959. When his 69th birthday came around last month, his fellow MCCC members thought it was a great time to organize one of their “mystery tours,” starting at the Oshawa clubhouse on Taunton Road East, and ending with a surprise finish at the club’s original headquarters: the old flax mill on Orono’s Main Street. Continue reading

Building boom at Nexus Gallery

2x2x4 artists

2x2x4 artists

Rick Hodges, of Nexus Gallery in Orono, wanted to take an idea and build on it, literally. In 2 x 2 by 4, Hodges challenged himself and three other artists to create works within the gallery using a supply of 2” x 2” lumber, a saw, and a nail gun.

The results are a playful yet thought-provoking exploration of wood and space by Hodges; his friend and fellow artist Jiri Ladocha; Toronto-based photographer Mats Nordstrom; and local Orono artist and teacher Tony Cooper. The site-specific pieces are rounded out by a few additional works by Ladocha and Cooper that also relate to the show’s themes.

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Nexus Gallery: new art at the old mill

It catches the eye of most visitors. With its imposing size and striking roof-line, the old flax mill has long been a landmark of Orono, nestled between the creek and Main Street, right where the road takes a dip at the north end of town. And so, in September 2006, it caught the eye of Richard Hodges, a master furniture maker from Toronto. Continue reading